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Wildlife Conservation Stories

OBSERVING NATURE AT TSWALU

In an unusual year for tourism, characterised by travel bans and fewer guests, wildlife photography became field guide Barry Peiser’s focus while living and working on the reserve during SA's lockdown.

MAKING PHOTOS FOR NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Photographer and explorer Thomas Peschak explains what goes into producing images for National Geographic that also highlight conservation issues, like climate change.

THE HYENAS THAT CALL TSWALU HOME

Did you know that Tswalu is home to three hyena species? The aardwolf, brown hyena and spotted hyena all play an important role in the health of the Kalahari ecosystem.

TRACKING A PANGOLIN PUP

Researchers from Dedeben, led by Dr Wendy Panaino, tagged a pangolin pup for the first time in 2021 to find out what would happen when it left its natal home range.

VALUE OF MICROCLIMATES IN THE KALAHARI

If plants and animals can find small areas in their environment that provide shelter from harsh radiation, there is hope that they may cope when climate is not in their favour.

SCAVENGING BROWN HYENA

Lucien Beaumont recently spent a few days on the reserve with guests. One of the highlights of their safari was a brown hyena sighting involving a pair of cheetahs and a stolen kill.

TRAVEL, CLIMATE CHANGE AND CONSERVATION

How tourism can help rather than hinder our efforts to preserve the natural world.

STUDYING SMALL MAMMALS

Considering their large impact on ecosystems, small mammals - especially mice, sengis and shrews - are particularly useful indicators of habitat health.

SMALL THINGS ABD TGE BIG PICTURE

We tend to associate size with importance, both in terms of the role something plays in the world and how impressed we ought to feel in its presence.

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