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Tswalu Blog

Conserving the Desert black rhino

Tswalu Kalahari Reserve is regarded as one of Africa’s great conservation stories, not only through the preservation of the southern Kalahari’s diverse habitats but also the protection of many rare and critically endangered species. One such species is the Desert black rhino.

Finding Tswalu’s elusive species

Tswalu is one of the best places on the continent to see five of the most elusive species in Africa, namely aardvark, pangolin, brown hyena, aardwolf and bat-eared fox. Game drives here provide up-close sightings of species that prove highly elusive elsewhere.

Vulture Conservation

Three of South Africa’s nine vulture species, including the once-prolific White-backed vulture, have declined to such an extent that they are regarded as Critically Endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Safari in private at Tswalu Kalahari

Tswalu’s remote location in the southern Kalahari offers the ultimate off-the-beaten-track escape. Physical distancing is nothing new in South Africa's largest, privately owned reserve.

A Walking Safari for Birders

Birders will be eager to discover many of the bird species of the southern Kalahari while at Tswalu.

Making friends with meerkats

Veronique Venter has devoted the past four years to habituating meerkat families, spending many hours in their presence to build their trust, so that our guests can view them in their natural environment.

Birding at Tswalu Kalahari

When one views Tswalu from a birding perspective, there would be few places comparable in the region. With a total list running in the region of 260 species there is plenty to be gained from spending a few solid hours at least trying to find some of the more iconic Kalahari species.

Elusive aardvark

Aardvarks are strange animals. They look like a bizarre hybrid between a kangaroo, pig and vacuum cleaner. They are mostly active at night, smell odd, and live most of their lives in solitude.

Tswalu Kalahari’s Cape cobras

I came to Tswalu almost two years ago to research the thermal ecology of Cape cobras using radio telemetry. The study falls under the Kalahari Endangered Ecosystem Project (KEEP), which looks at the responses of Kalahari organisms to climate change.

Five birds to tick off at Tswalu

Are you interested in birding, but perhaps have no idea where to start? My interest in birding began when I started working as a field guide, and once I’d grasped their entertainment value I quickly became hooked. Learning bird calls was the quickest way to recognise more species and add them to my list. Here’s a quick introduction to five birds I never tire of seeing at Tswalu.

Tracker Academy at Tswalu Kalahari

They say an experienced tracker can read the earth like a book. Successful tracking demands experience, knowledge, patience, physical endurance, and mental focus, often under challenging environmental conditions over extended periods.

Boomslang – predator and prey

The boomslang (meaning ‘tree snake’ in Afrikaans) is regularly sighted at Tswalu, winding its way through the massive nests of sociable weavers. These magnificent structures consist of various chambers, occupied by mating pairs and their chicks, and are usually built around sturdy acacia trees. The snakes move from chamber to chamber, looking for food, then wedge their bodies into the chamber hole when they find the chicks or eggs they’re after.

World Pangolin Day

On World Pangolin Day we are reminded that all species of pangolin are threatened by illegal trade, which persists and is escalating.

Raising cheetah cubs

Recently at Tswalu Kalahari, a cheetah gave birth to five cubs. Unfortunately, only a few of these little cubs have a chance of reaching adulthood and independence.

Tswalu declared South Africa’s first Vulture Safe Zone

On 7 September 2019, International Vulture Awareness Day, BirdLife South Africa declared Tswalu Kalahari Game Reserve as South Africa’s first Vulture Safe Zone.

Kalahari Endangered Ecosystem Project

The KEEP (Kalahari Endangered Ecosystem Project) project has been formed to try to answer some of the pressing issues related specifically to climate change effects in the Southern Kalahari region.

Five reasons to visit Tswalu

A great read by guest blogger James Bainbridge  from SafariBookings.com. A major draw of Tswalu Kalahari is that it is a malaria-free reserve; five other top reasons to visit are listed here.

Seasons of Tswalu

Tswalu is, as we tell people, “big country” with boundaries beyond horizons. It provides a stunning backdrop to the dramatic changes that accompany each new season.  

Exploring the fascinating world of camouflage in nature

The classic idea of camouflage is a unique, cryptic colour-pattern combination of an organism that enables it to blend into its environment to escape detection.

Observing wildlife through camera traps

Once in a while, trap cameras turn up really remarkable sightings – like this female honey badger. If thoughtfully used, are a wonderful way to unobtrusively observe what is happening in the world around us.

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